Nike Pegasus 37: The trusted sneaker for avid runners gets a major overhaul

Nike Pegasus 37: The trusted sneaker for avid runners gets a major overhaul

The Nike Pegasus is now in its 37th iteration, this time sporting some of the biggest changes the sneaker has ever received.

The Nike Pegasus 37 is now available on Nike.com retailing at S$199 each.

There is a reason why the Nike Pegasus has lasted this long. Beyond the incremental updates over the last 37 years, the Nike Pegasus has been one of the most trusted runners in Nike’s line up. For this year’s all-new Nike Pegasus 37, the runner features some major updates in terms of design and construction.

Pegasus 37 running

Downsized Zoom unit

First up, Nike downsized the Zoom unit from full length to a smaller forefoot unit with twice the thickness. On top of that, the brand tailored the runner’s feel to each gender’s preferences by altering the pressure within each unit. These changes were made based on feedback from runners which revealed that women preferred softer forefoot units while men preferred more responsive ones.

New midsole configuration

Next, Nike introduced a new midsole configuration – encasing the forefoot Zoom unit into a React foam. Yes, you read that right. Just like the Pegasus ZoomX, the new Pegasus 37 comes with a full React midsole. This allows the sneaker to be much lighter than its predecessors and provide much better impact protection. Combine that with a thin, mesh upper, the Nike Pegasus 37 presents itself as one of the lightest runners you can get.

But not everything has changed. The Nike Pegasus 37 still has a collar that tapers away from your heel – to prevent abrasions. It also has the same waffle outsole, so you can expect the same level of grip as seen on prior Pegasus runners.

If you are looking to upgrade to the Pegasus 37, you can cop a pair on Nike.com for S$199.

What do you think of the latest upgrades in the Nike Pegasus 37? Share your thoughts in the comment section.

All images: Nike.com

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